On Forgetfulness

On Forgetfulness. My secondary school teacher once told me (after I forgot to bring my textbook to class) that it is worse to forget than to intentionally not bring the textbook.

I didn’t understand what she meant at the time. I thought she was being difficult. How can an unintentional act be worse than an intentional one?


Now, years later, I think I know what she meant. If I forget something, this something must mean very little to me. It WAS “not important” enough to get me to think about or plan ahead for it. If her class meant more to me, I would have prepared my textbooks and packed my school bag the night before. I forget because it is not important to me. So, my teacher was right. And because for her, it was worse that a student think that her lesson was unimportant than for a student who purposely not bring the textbook.



At first, I felt guilty. But later I realized that there will always be things that are less important to me. It is not possible to treat everything as important. It would be very tiring for me. I am just a human being after all.